Having spent the previous practice period focusing on the details of the felled trees, I decide to change to a 50mm lens and capture the ghostly figures of the few trees that remain.  Whilst I would like to think that they were spared for good reason, I suspect that their survival was more about the practicalities of access for the machinery.  I am pleased however there is a small stand of trees close to the loch which hints at what has been lost, what is absent from the landscape.  I use intentional camera movement as a means of producing a mysterious, ghostly aesthetic.  I use a number of viewpoints to capture the presence of these remaining trees.

Fracture 37 – Alison Price, January 2022

Fracture 38 – Alison Price, January 2022

Fracture 39 – Alison Price, January 2022

Fracture 40 – Alison Price, January 2022

Fracture 41 – Alison Price, January 2021

I move further up the track to a few stranded silver birch trees – their trunks fragile without the support of many more that have been felled, probably as a consequence of their proximity to larger trees.

Fracture 42 – Alison Price, January 2022

And on to a few trees in my favourite part of the forest around the headland.

Fracture 42 – Alison Price, January 2022

And finally, I try to capture the ‘weeping trees’ in the log piles, waiting for their final journey and destination.  Their presence alludes to the absence and presence of this sad landscape.

Fracture 42 – Alison Price, January 2022

Fracture 42 – Alison Price, January 2022

Fracture 44 – Alison Price, January 2022

 

 

Alison Price

Alison Price

My name is Alison Price and for the past ten years I have travelled the world photographing wildlife, including Alaska, Antarctica, Borneo, Botswana, the Canadian Arctic, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
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