Another day, more bad weather . . .  But I intend to keep to my commitment of going out in all weathers.  Although it is not raining the forecast promises heavy rain and high winds.  I make a practical decision to head for the forest.  I had planned to continue with my multiple exposure work but when I reach the location, I decide to use intentional camera movement.  The tripod I had carried for a considerable distance is therefore not required.

The leaves and needles still on the trees have taken on a winter pallor, less saturated and brown rather than orange, just like the reeds at the loch yesterday.  I try to avoid the lifeless skies as much as possible, using them only to provide glimpses of that which lies beyond the edge of the forest.  I also use the white backdrop to provide a simple background to the frenzied movement of the slender trees swaying from side to side.  I also look up into the canopy at the dizzying movement and cacophony of shapes and patterns.  I play with my camera, moving my hand in different directions and mimicking the shape, form and movement of the trees.  I pick out aspects of foreground and background interest depending on the scene.  I finish my work in the dense forest and as I struggle with low light it starts to rain heavily.

Although it is difficult to know for sure until I view my images on the computer monitor, I feel reasonably confident that I may have a few keepers although, like yesterday with the reeds, I feel I may be revisiting ideas and methods I have tried before.  But hopefully the hit rate and the images will be an improvement on the work I did in the autumn and spring seasons of Year 1.

Reduction 53 – Alison Price, November 2021

Reduction 54 – Alison Price, November 2021

Reduction 55 – Alison Price, November 2021

Reduction 56 – Alison Price, November 2021

Reduction 57 – Alison Price, November 2021

Reduction 58 – Alison Price, November 2021

 

Alison Price

Alison Price

My name is Alison Price and for the past ten years I have travelled the world photographing wildlife, including Alaska, Antarctica, Borneo, Botswana, the Canadian Arctic, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
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